Tag Archives: Savanna Museum and Cultural Center

Savanna Museum and Cultural Center Indoor Cemetery Tour

Savanna Museum and Cultural Center Indoor Cemetery Tour

Savanna Museum and Cultural Center Indoor Cemetery Tour

“Legacies of Savanna,” an indoor seated cemetery tour, will be given on Saturday, October 22nd at the Savanna Museum and Cultural Center, 406 Main Street at 2:00 pm.

First person presenters will portray eight of Savanna’s former citizens.

The honored citizens for the tour will include: Aaron Pierce, founder of Savanna, Captain Stoughton Cooley, steamboat captain, Bothwell Pulford, pharmacist, Simon Greenleaf, editor, Hazel Law, storeowner, Esther Reagan, educator, Mel Jones, businessman, and Robert Kelly, former POW.

Jean Ferris, creator of the event, said, “ I want to honor past citizens from different eras and walks of life. Their stories are important to our history and help us define who and what we are today. The figures will be portrayed with dignity and respect. We will learn about their lives and what legacies they have left us. The event is suitable for all ages.”

Held in the Community Room of the museum, a donation of $8.00 is appreciated.

Native American Speaker at Savanna Museum and Cultural Center

Saturday, March 19th, 2016 2:00 PM

Kim McIver, Native American of the Ojibwa tribe will be a guest speaker at the Savanna Museum and Cultural Center, 406 Main Street, on Saturday, March 19th at 2:00pm.

Kim, is a talented speaker, performer, as well as publisher and self publisher of award winning books. She will bring to life, music and stories of her Indian Culture.

The Ojibwa (said to mean “Puckered Moccasin People”) have a number of spiritual beliefs passed down by oral traditions. These include a creation story and a recounting of the origins of ceremonies and rituals. Spiritual beliefs and rituals were very important to the Ojibwa because spirits guided them through life.

The Ojibwa crafted the dreamcatcher. They believe that if one is hung above the head of a sleeper, it will catch and trap bad dreams, preventing them from reaching the dreamer. Traditional Ojibwa use dreamcatchers only for children, as they believe that adults should be able to interpret their dreams, good or bad, and use them in their lives.

United States, they have the fourth-largest population among Native American tribes,

A $5.00 donation will be appreciated.